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Acting as designers, distributors and promo models, Escobar-Morales established an online marketing and brand design agency called AMerican MEdia Output.  The ad campaigns for Public Airways and Welcome to Arizona are inspired by recent news related to proposed immigration legislation in the US.  Blurring the line between performance and reality, AMerican MEdia Output asks viewers and participants to imagine the economic and social consequences of laws like SB1070 through the framework of advertising.  AMO is based online at AMericanMEdiaOutput.com and has disseminated their advertising over the internet using various social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.  Most recently, the AZ Welcome Girls hit the streets in San Antonio, TX to promote Arizona tourism by offering participants a cold drink of “Welcome Water.”
(via Don’t worry. Our girls are legal. « Maya Talk)

Acting as designers, distributors and promo models, Escobar-Morales established an online marketing and brand design agency called AMerican MEdia Output.  The ad campaigns for Public Airways and Welcome to Arizona are inspired by recent news related to proposed immigration legislation in the US.  Blurring the line between performance and reality, AMerican MEdia Output asks viewers and participants to imagine the economic and social consequences of laws like SB1070 through the framework of advertising.  AMO is based online at AMericanMEdiaOutput.com and has disseminated their advertising over the internet using various social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.  Most recently, the AZ Welcome Girls hit the streets in San Antonio, TX to promote Arizona tourism by offering participants a cold drink of “Welcome Water.”

(via Don’t worry. Our girls are legal. « Maya Talk)

You’ve got the world in your hands. And I’ve got my feet off the ground. (via Hollywood. | Are You My Other?)

You’ve got the world in your hands. And I’ve got my feet off the ground. (via Hollywood. | Are You My Other?)

PAPELES: Are we what we sign? aims to serve as a visual examination of our social bond with papers as legal signifiers of identity that shape individual mobility, cultural acceptance, gender and sexual-orientation equality, economic access, labor opportunities, and educational attainment.  Visual artists, community leaders, and arts administrators use this project to reflect upon the socio-cultural impact of documentation processes present in American society.
This exhibition gathers twelve influential—established and emerging—artists working in drawing, painting, installation, printmaking, photography, and mixed media. Participating artists include Andrea Rincon, Andria Morales, Carlos Nuñez, Doris Nogueira-Rogers, Erika Ristovski, the duo Escobar-Morales, Jonas Dos Santos, Jorge Figueroa, Lina Cedeño, Michelle Ortiz, Paula Meninato, and Susana Amundaraín.  They propose social-visual experiments from their positions as immigrants and/or descendants of immigrants from Latin American nations. New and existing works in this exhibition illuminate the concept of documentation into powerful narratives of critique, ambiguity, longing, and resilience.
 
The Painted Bride230 Vine Street | Philadelphia, PA 19106 | 215.925.9914
September 7 – October 21, 2012Gallery hours: 12pm – 6pm, Tues – SatFirst Friday receptions: September 7, October 5 | 5-7:30pm Guest Curator Andreina Castillo | Co-Presented with Acción Colombia
(via Escobar-Morales at The Painted Bride in Papeles: Are we what we sign? « Maya Talk)

PAPELES: Are we what we sign? aims to serve as a visual examination of our social bond with papers as legal signifiers of identity that shape individual mobility, cultural acceptance, gender and sexual-orientation equality, economic access, labor opportunities, and educational attainment.  Visual artists, community leaders, and arts administrators use this project to reflect upon the socio-cultural impact of documentation processes present in American society.

This exhibition gathers twelve influential—established and emerging—artists working in drawing, painting, installation, printmaking, photography, and mixed media. Participating artists include Andrea Rincon, Andria Morales, Carlos Nuñez, Doris Nogueira-Rogers, Erika Ristovski, the duo Escobar-Morales, Jonas Dos Santos, Jorge Figueroa, Lina Cedeño, Michelle Ortiz, Paula Meninato, and Susana Amundaraín.  They propose social-visual experiments from their positions as immigrants and/or descendants of immigrants from Latin American nations. New and existing works in this exhibition illuminate the concept of documentation into powerful narratives of critique, ambiguity, longing, and resilience.

 

The Painted Bride
230 Vine Street | Philadelphia, PA 19106 | 215.925.9914

September 7 – October 21, 2012
Gallery hours: 12pm – 6pm, Tues – Sat
First Friday receptions: September 7, October 5 | 5-7:30pm
Guest Curator Andreina Castillo | Co-Presented with Acción Colombia

(via Escobar-Morales at The Painted Bride in Papeles: Are we what we sign? « Maya Talk)

There I was, in the studio of our great spiritual ancestor, who spent her life depicting her image in an effort to better portray her reality.  Did she look in this mirror too?
Standing in Frida’s painting room and looking at the place where she used to sit down to work.  Seeing myself in her mirror.  Seeing myself looking back at myself, it’s confirmed that I AM not her. I’m only ME.
(via La Casa Azul in Coyoacán | Are You My Other?)

There I was, in the studio of our great spiritual ancestor, who spent her life depicting her image in an effort to better portray her reality.  Did she look in this mirror too?

Standing in Frida’s painting room and looking at the place where she used to sit down to work.  Seeing myself in her mirror.  Seeing myself looking back at myself, it’s confirmed that I AM not her. I’m only ME.

(via La Casa Azul in Coyoacán | Are You My Other?)

Performance artists Escobar-Morales perform a funerary ritual, referencing the mythical Mayan tale of the Hero Twins reviving their dead father, the Maize God. In their contemporary interpretation of this ancient story, Escobar-Morales simultaneously represent the body and the soul; the God/ Goddess and twin offspring, in both physical and technological forms using live performance and web based video projection. Performed at Jolie-Laide gallery in Philadelphia.
(via Escobar-Morales: Excerpts from the Ressurection of Hun-Nal-Ye « Maya Talk)

Performance artists Escobar-Morales perform a funerary ritual, referencing the mythical Mayan tale of the Hero Twins reviving their dead father, the Maize God. In their contemporary interpretation of this ancient story, Escobar-Morales simultaneously represent the body and the soul; the God/ Goddess and twin offspring, in both physical and technological forms using live performance and web based video projection. Performed at Jolie-Laide gallery in Philadelphia.

(via Escobar-Morales: Excerpts from the Ressurection of Hun-Nal-Ye « Maya Talk)

elpunoylamano:

La Valiente by Linda Monsivais

elpunoylamano:

La Valiente by Linda Monsivais

(via lalilster)

I got to meet Don Francisco in Miami!
(via Photo by mayanoemi • Instagram)

I got to meet Don Francisco in Miami!

(via Photo by mayanoemi • Instagram)

The Latino Camera Crew.
(via On the job. | Are You My Other?)

The Latino Camera Crew.

(via On the job. | Are You My Other?)

Acting as designers, distributors and promo models, Escobar-Morales established an online marketing and brand design agency called AMerican MEdia Output.  The ad campaigns for Public Airways and Welcome to Arizona are inspired by recent news related to proposed immigration legislation in the US.  Blurring the line between performance and reality, AMerican MEdia Output asks viewers and participants to imagine the economic and social consequences of laws like SB1070 through the framework of advertising.  AMO is based online at AMericanMEdiaOutput.com and has disseminated their advertising over the internet using various social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.  Most recently, the AZ Welcome Girls hit the streets in San Antonio, TX to promote Arizona tourism by offering participants a cold drink of “Welcome Water.”
(via Don’t worry. Our girls are legal. « Maya Talk)

Acting as designers, distributors and promo models, Escobar-Morales established an online marketing and brand design agency called AMerican MEdia Output.  The ad campaigns for Public Airways and Welcome to Arizona are inspired by recent news related to proposed immigration legislation in the US.  Blurring the line between performance and reality, AMerican MEdia Output asks viewers and participants to imagine the economic and social consequences of laws like SB1070 through the framework of advertising.  AMO is based online at AMericanMEdiaOutput.com and has disseminated their advertising over the internet using various social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.  Most recently, the AZ Welcome Girls hit the streets in San Antonio, TX to promote Arizona tourism by offering participants a cold drink of “Welcome Water.”

(via Don’t worry. Our girls are legal. « Maya Talk)

You’ve got the world in your hands. And I’ve got my feet off the ground. (via Hollywood. | Are You My Other?)

You’ve got the world in your hands. And I’ve got my feet off the ground. (via Hollywood. | Are You My Other?)

PAPELES: Are we what we sign? aims to serve as a visual examination of our social bond with papers as legal signifiers of identity that shape individual mobility, cultural acceptance, gender and sexual-orientation equality, economic access, labor opportunities, and educational attainment.  Visual artists, community leaders, and arts administrators use this project to reflect upon the socio-cultural impact of documentation processes present in American society.
This exhibition gathers twelve influential—established and emerging—artists working in drawing, painting, installation, printmaking, photography, and mixed media. Participating artists include Andrea Rincon, Andria Morales, Carlos Nuñez, Doris Nogueira-Rogers, Erika Ristovski, the duo Escobar-Morales, Jonas Dos Santos, Jorge Figueroa, Lina Cedeño, Michelle Ortiz, Paula Meninato, and Susana Amundaraín.  They propose social-visual experiments from their positions as immigrants and/or descendants of immigrants from Latin American nations. New and existing works in this exhibition illuminate the concept of documentation into powerful narratives of critique, ambiguity, longing, and resilience.
 
The Painted Bride230 Vine Street | Philadelphia, PA 19106 | 215.925.9914
September 7 – October 21, 2012Gallery hours: 12pm – 6pm, Tues – SatFirst Friday receptions: September 7, October 5 | 5-7:30pm Guest Curator Andreina Castillo | Co-Presented with Acción Colombia
(via Escobar-Morales at The Painted Bride in Papeles: Are we what we sign? « Maya Talk)

PAPELES: Are we what we sign? aims to serve as a visual examination of our social bond with papers as legal signifiers of identity that shape individual mobility, cultural acceptance, gender and sexual-orientation equality, economic access, labor opportunities, and educational attainment.  Visual artists, community leaders, and arts administrators use this project to reflect upon the socio-cultural impact of documentation processes present in American society.

This exhibition gathers twelve influential—established and emerging—artists working in drawing, painting, installation, printmaking, photography, and mixed media. Participating artists include Andrea Rincon, Andria Morales, Carlos Nuñez, Doris Nogueira-Rogers, Erika Ristovski, the duo Escobar-Morales, Jonas Dos Santos, Jorge Figueroa, Lina Cedeño, Michelle Ortiz, Paula Meninato, and Susana Amundaraín.  They propose social-visual experiments from their positions as immigrants and/or descendants of immigrants from Latin American nations. New and existing works in this exhibition illuminate the concept of documentation into powerful narratives of critique, ambiguity, longing, and resilience.

 

The Painted Bride
230 Vine Street | Philadelphia, PA 19106 | 215.925.9914

September 7 – October 21, 2012
Gallery hours: 12pm – 6pm, Tues – Sat
First Friday receptions: September 7, October 5 | 5-7:30pm
Guest Curator Andreina Castillo | Co-Presented with Acción Colombia

(via Escobar-Morales at The Painted Bride in Papeles: Are we what we sign? « Maya Talk)

There I was, in the studio of our great spiritual ancestor, who spent her life depicting her image in an effort to better portray her reality.  Did she look in this mirror too?
Standing in Frida’s painting room and looking at the place where she used to sit down to work.  Seeing myself in her mirror.  Seeing myself looking back at myself, it’s confirmed that I AM not her. I’m only ME.
(via La Casa Azul in Coyoacán | Are You My Other?)

There I was, in the studio of our great spiritual ancestor, who spent her life depicting her image in an effort to better portray her reality.  Did she look in this mirror too?

Standing in Frida’s painting room and looking at the place where she used to sit down to work.  Seeing myself in her mirror.  Seeing myself looking back at myself, it’s confirmed that I AM not her. I’m only ME.

(via La Casa Azul in Coyoacán | Are You My Other?)

Performance artists Escobar-Morales perform a funerary ritual, referencing the mythical Mayan tale of the Hero Twins reviving their dead father, the Maize God. In their contemporary interpretation of this ancient story, Escobar-Morales simultaneously represent the body and the soul; the God/ Goddess and twin offspring, in both physical and technological forms using live performance and web based video projection. Performed at Jolie-Laide gallery in Philadelphia.
(via Escobar-Morales: Excerpts from the Ressurection of Hun-Nal-Ye « Maya Talk)

Performance artists Escobar-Morales perform a funerary ritual, referencing the mythical Mayan tale of the Hero Twins reviving their dead father, the Maize God. In their contemporary interpretation of this ancient story, Escobar-Morales simultaneously represent the body and the soul; the God/ Goddess and twin offspring, in both physical and technological forms using live performance and web based video projection. Performed at Jolie-Laide gallery in Philadelphia.

(via Escobar-Morales: Excerpts from the Ressurection of Hun-Nal-Ye « Maya Talk)

elpunoylamano:

La Valiente by Linda Monsivais

elpunoylamano:

La Valiente by Linda Monsivais

(via lalilster)

I got to meet Don Francisco in Miami!
(via Photo by mayanoemi • Instagram)

I got to meet Don Francisco in Miami!

(via Photo by mayanoemi • Instagram)

The Latino Camera Crew.
(via On the job. | Are You My Other?)

The Latino Camera Crew.

(via On the job. | Are You My Other?)

About:

Maya Escobar is a performance artist, Internet curator, and editor. She uses the web as a platform for engaging in critical community dialogues that concern processes by which identities are socially and culturally constructed. She performs multiple identities, sampling widely from online representations of existing cultural discourses. Her identifications as a Latina-Jewish artist, dyslexic blogger, fitness enthusiast, activist and educator are indexed by the blogs she keeps, the visual and textual links she posts, the books, articles, and blog posts she cites, the public comments she leaves, and the groups she joins.

Escobar received her MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University in St. Louis, and her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited work in Spain, Guatemala, United States, Germany, Venezuela, and Chile.

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